Category: Curry

Consider The Mutton Curry

 

Today we are taking a huge step back in time and heading back to  the time of gas lamps, hansom cabs and thick London fogs.  How nice then in this cold inhospitable atmosphere to pop into the Oriental Club for a spicy mutton curry to warm your cockles on a cold winter’s night!  Just think, Arthur Conan Doyle could have tucked into this curry as he pondered the intricacies of the first Sherlock Holmes story.  

And now you can too!

19th Century Curry 2 Our mutton curry comes from  1861  from The Oriental Club’s chef, Richard Terry who made use of the ingredients from the first Asian grocery warehouse in  London to recreate a curry recipe he had learned from Indian cooks.  It is also indicative of Britain’s and Briton’s long-lasting love of curry! 

This is certainly not a curry in a hurry!  There are several parts to making this, which is time-consuming but if you have the patience, it is well worth the effort.  Also, whilst the original recipe called for mutton, I used lamb.  I could not find mutton anywhere – not even dressed as lamb.  Funnily enough though, my mum says that in Sri Lanka when any recipe called for lamb or mutton, what they actually used was goat so use what you can get.

19th Century Curry Powder ingredientsFirst up, you need to roast up some spices to make a curry powder.  This will make more than you need for one curry so you will have supplies if you want to make this again or you can use it in other curries. 

19th Century Curry PowderOne thing that is strange about this curry is that you not only need a curry powder but also a curry paste. 

Whilst we’re roasting and grinding those spices, let’s talk Sherlock!  I am a HUGE fan of the BBC series with Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman and Andrew Scott because who doesn’t love a bad boy right?  And I am over the moon excited to see Series 4.  Tom Hiddleston! Colin Farrell! This series is  going to be AWESOME! 

19th Century Curry Paste IngredientsNow, a very weird thing about this curry paste is that it contains lentils which you grind up.  I have never heard of this technique before but…hey, if it’s good enough for the The Duke of Wellington, who was the President of the Oriental Club back in the day, it’s good enough for me!  The genius stroke is that they help to make the gravy lovely and thick. 

Mutton curry (maybe even one based on this recipe!) features as a clue in a Sherlock Holmes story.  In The Adventure of Silver Blaze, which not only contains the phrase”Consider the mutton curry,” the title of this post but also “the curious incident of the dog in the night-time”, a mutton curry is doused with powdered opium, putting the stable boy meant to be guarding the race horse Silver Blaze into a stupor and hence rendering him unable to do his job. 

19th Century Curry Paste

The paste mix will also make more than you need for one curry but will keep in the fridge for months.

Sadly, Sherlock Holmes may not have been a fan of curry.  At least not according to the 1946 film, Terror by Night.  This however is not based on a Conan Doyle story so this is open for debate.  Terror By Night is also available for free download here.  Personally, I think Sherlock would have been a fan of this mutton curry…with or without a garnish of powdered opium. 

  19th Century Curry 2

The 19th Century Mutton Curry was delicious, dark and spicy, thanks to those lentils, the gravy was lovely and thick and the meat was tender.  This was a winner!  And hey, I’ve got paste and powder left so I’ll definitely be making it again!

Best served with an ice-cold beer! Whilst watching Series 4 of Sherlock!

Any leftovers?  A curry jaffle is THE best hangover food known to man.  Just sayin’. Tis the season after all!

Oh and by the way, the Oriental Club still exists and curries still feature on the menu.  I am adding to the list for a trip to London next year!

19th Century British Mutton Curry
A delicious mutton curry from the days of The Raj, Queen Victoria and Sherlock Holmes!
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19th Century British Curry Powder
  1. 2 tbsp ground turmeric
  2. 5 tsp ground coriander
  3. 2 tsp ground ginger
  4. 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  5. 1 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  6. 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  7. 1/2 tsp ground cardamom seeds
  8. 1/2 tsp ground cloves
19th Century British Curry Paste
  1. 4 tbsp whole coriander seeds
  2. 2 tbsp yellow split peas
  3. 1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
  4. 1 1/2 whole cumin seeds
  5. 1 tbsp whole brown mustard seeds
  6. 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  7. 1 tbsp cayenne pepper
  8. 1 1/2 tsp minced ginger
  9. 2 tsp salt
  10. 2 tsp sugar
  11. 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  12. 120ml cider vinegar
  13. 6 tbsp corn, peanut or olive oil
Curry
  1. 675g bones lamb, cut into 2.5cm cubes
  2. 2 tbsp 19th Century British Curry Powder
  3. 1 tbsp 19th Century British Curry Paste
  4. 200g onions, peeled and finely chopped
  5. 4 tbsp corn, peanut oil or ghee
  6. 3/4 - 1tsp salt
For The 19th Century British Curry Powder
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a jar. Mix. Cover with a tight lid.
  2. Store away from heat and sunlight.
  3. Makes 7 tablespoons.
For The 19th Century British Curry Powder
  1. Put the coriander seeds, split peas, peppercorns and cumin into a medium cast iron frypan and set on medium heat. Stir and roast until the split peas are reddish, the coriander has turned a shade darker and all the spices begin to give off a roasted aroma.
  2. Empty them into a bowl and allow to cool.
  3. Put the roasted spices and the mustard seeds into a spice grinder or food processor and grind as finely as possible. Place in a bowl.
  4. Add thee turmeric, cayenne pepper, ginger, salt, sugar, garlic and vinegar.
  5. Stir to mix.
  6. Pour the oil into a small non-stick frying pan and set over a medium heat.
  7. Add the spice paste.
  8. Stir and fry for around 5 minutes or until it browns slightly.
  9. Cool, then empty into a jar.
  10. Cover tightly and refrigerate until needed.
For The Curry
  1. Put the oil or ghee in a heavy, wide, lidded pan. Set it over a medium high heat.
  2. When the oil is hot, stir in the onions and fry them until they are lightly browned.
  3. Add the curry powder and curry paste.
  4. Stir a few times then add the meat and half the salt.
  5. Stir and fry for a few minutes until the meat is coated in the spice mix.
  6. Cover and reduce the heat to low.
  7. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  8. Add 600ml water and increase the heat/ Bring to the boil.
  9. Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook for an hour until the meat is tender and the sauce is thick.
  10. Season to taste and serve.
Notes
  1. If the sauce is not thick enough, remove the lid and let it boil down.
Adapted from Richard Terry's Indian Cookery, 1861 via Madhur Jaffrey
Adapted from Richard Terry's Indian Cookery, 1861 via Madhur Jaffrey
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
Have a great week!  Enjoy your holidays if you are on them, enjoy Sherlock S4 if you are watching.  Let me know if you are, we can compare notes after!

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Duck Duck Curry

January may be over but I had to post one last quirky but delicious recipe. And this is a beauty.  You wouldn’t think to look at it that this duck curry is one of my Spice Peddler “Oh no, let’s go crazy” recipes.  But it is. So please join me on a Hop, Step and a Jump around the world as we take a look at this yummy duck curry.

Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You’re off to Great Places!
You’re off and away!

 

The Hop – Reunion Island

 So guess what makes this duck curry so kooky?

Well, it’s got duck….duh!!!  And sweet potatoes.  So nothing odd there.  It’s got some sun-dried tomatoes which I have never used in a curry before but a tomato is a tomato right? But you know what else it’s got?  Wait for it…..vanilla beans!

 Who puts vanilla beans in a curry?

Well apparently the people of the island of Reunion do. 

And you know what? 

It works!!!!

The Step – Tahiti

So from the Indian Ocean, we’re going to fasten our seatbelts and stow our tray tables because we’re now off to another tiny island but this time in the French Polynesian part of the Pacific Ocean.

Simon, Tahiti….

 I guess the original recipe would use Madagascan vanilla beans but the Tahitian Vanilla beans which I got from the  team at the Spice Peddlers has a rich fruity, floral, slightly aniseedy flavour which I think combined really well with the vegetables and the ginger in the curry. 

Vanilla Duck Curry - Vegetables
Vanilla Duck Curry – Vegetables

The vanilla flavour here is not overpowering, it is an undertone.  Unless you were told there was vanilla in it you would know there was something there but probably not automatically guess it was vanilla. . As the people of Reunion and Tahiti  may say, it just adds that certain “je ne sais quoi”  to what would otherwise be a pretty standard curry.

Duck and Vanilla Curry2
Duck and Vanilla Curry2

 The Jump – Iran

 I served this with one of the recipes from Persiana by Sabrina Ghayour – the Chelo or Persian Basmati Rice. I was a bit disappointed by this as one of my favourite things from Vietnamese cooking is when you have claypot rice and you get those lovely chewy almost burnt bits of rice.  I really wanted my chelo to turn out like that.  Sadly that was not to be.

Mine looked like this:

Persian Basmati Rice2
Persian Basmati Rice2

You can see what it should have looked like here.

Still, I think I’m taking the failure pretty well….

Have a great week! 

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Duck and Vanilla Curry
A delicious, slightly spicy duck curry with an unexpected ingredient
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Ingredients
  1. 1/2 vanilla bean, halved lengthwise, seeds scraped out and reserved, bean cut into pieces about 1 cm long
  2. 2 teaspoons mild curry powder
  3. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  4. 4 duck breasts
  5. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  6. 3 medium onion, chopped (4 cups)
  7. 2 medium tomatoes, chopped (1 cup)
  8. 1 sweet potato peeled and cut into 1 cm cubes
  9. 2 to 3 sun-dried tomatoes, finely chopped
  10. 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
  11. 1 tbsp ginger, grated
  12. 1 whole clove
  13. To garnish (optional)
  14. Chopped peanuts
  15. Chopped coriander
Instructions
  1. Combine the vanilla seeds, curry powder and salt in a small bowl.
  2. Score the duck breasts on the skin side (ie run the knife over the duck skin to create a cross hatch pattern. Do not go through the skin to the actual meat.
  3. Rub the spice mixture on the duck breasts both skin and meat side.
  4. Lay the duck breasts, skin side down, in a dry heavy-based large frying pan and gradually turn up the heat. Fry for five to 10 minutes, until most of the fat has rendered and the skin is golden brown.
  5. Turn the duck breasts over and lightly brown the other side for a couple of minutes, or until they feel slightly springy when pressed.
  6. Remove the duck from the pan.
  7. Add the butter and allow it to melt.
  8. Add the onion; cook for 5 minutes, until it has softened, then add the garlic and ginger. Add the tomato, sweet potato, sun-dried tomatoes and the clove; cook uncovered until sweet potato is just tender then add the duck back to the pan and allow to warm through.
  9. Discard the clove and the pieces of vanilla bean before serving.
  10. Garnish with chopped peanuts and coriander.
Adapted from Traditional Réunionnais recipe via the Washington Post
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/

RFFMT – Running Amok in Siem Reap

Amok is the national dish of Cambodia – it is a yellow curry and can be made with chicken, fish or seafood.  I ate ’em all.  And they were all delicious! It is also served a variety of ways – often it comes wrapped in a banana leaf:

Amok  - Lotus Blanc
Amok – Lotus Blanc

 Or a coconut: 

Chicken Amok Siem Reap
Chicken Amok Siem Reap

Or sometimes, rather boringly on a plate!  Boo…

Chicken Amok 3
Chicken Amok 3

When we were in Siem Reap, I did a cooking class and learned to cook it! Here’s what I made in the class:

My PhotoFy_09_14_21_07

And Here’s one I made when I got home:

Home Made  Seafood Amok
Home Made Seafood Amok

 

But first…Siem Reap is a pretty town with sights ranging from the traditional:

Monks  - Siem Reap
Monks – Siem Reap

 

Market - Siem Reap
Market – Siem Reap

To the distinctly more modern:

Pub Street  - Siem Reap
Pub Street – Siem Reap

I couldn’t resist putting in this photo, it looks like Mark’s been photobombed by a pineapple! 

Siem Reap - Cocktails
Siem Reap – Cocktails

 There is also a bustling market for souvenirs and some lovely gift shops.  But dominating tourism in Siem Reap is it’s proximity to Angkor Wat, which is Unesco Heritage listed and the largest temple complex in the world.  The tourism system is very well organised, you can buy a one, three or seven day temple pass so can spend as  much time as you want exploring the area.

Cambodia Souvenirs
Cambodia Souvenirs

 We did a one day pass which was possibly a mistake.  By the end of the day, we were utterly exhausted!  I felt a bit sorry for our guide actually, he kept valiantly trying to explain the history to us but, by late afternoon, most of our group were beyond listening. And there were monkeys…

Monkeys - Angkor Wat

 And not just any monkeys…baby monkeys!!!!  Otherwise known as the cutest things in the world!

Monkeys - Angkor Wat2
Monkeys – Angkor Wat2

  I am a five year old.

Seriously though, the temples were pretty amazing…

Angkor Thom

Angkor Thom was stunning and probably my favourite out of all of them. 

Angkor Thom

Angkor Thom2
Angkor Thom2

 And you could rub noses with Buddha…

Rubbing Noses
Rubbing Noses

 Told you I was a 5 year old!

Ta Prohm

Then on to Ta Prohm which is the tree temple.  And pretty spectacular in itself:

Ta Prohm1
Ta Prohm1
Ta Prohm2
Ta Prohm2

  And then there was the big one, the one they all come to see.

Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat
Angkor Wat

  You can get pretty high here..in a completely natural way:

Angkor Wat2
Angkor Wat2

 But whoo…those stairs are steep!  I’m really, really scared of heights..the going up was fine.  The coming down on these very steep, but also very narrow steps, when it had just started to rain so everything was a little bit more slippery than it should have been?  Completely terrifying.  One of the most nerve wracking things I have ever done….

Steps Angkor Wat
Steps Angkor Wat

 What was not terrifying but totally amazing was the cooking school at The Temple I attended the next day.  And just whilst we’re on this.  The cooking school at the Temple?  $US10.  Best bang for buck cooking school EVER.  Did I mention before that the default currency in Cambodia is the US dollar?  You only ever get proper Cambodian money as small change. It’s really weird….

Anyway, for your $10 you get to make three things.  You have seen my Amok.  I also chose to make a Green Mango Salad which was super delicious:

Green Mango Salad
Green Mango Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third thing was a dessert but it wasn’t very nice.  Hence no photos. 

Making Amok

There was a funny moment though.  When they laid out the ingredients for the amok, I looked at them and thought.  “Wow, carrots must be expensive here.  But what’s the point of that one teeny, tiny piece.  What the hell good is that going to do?”

Ingredients - Amok
Ingredients – Amok

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That my friends, is not carrot.  It is turmeric.  Which I had only ever seen as a bright yellow powder before, hence my confusion. IT is also what gives the Amok it’s traditional yellow colour.  If you can’t find fresh turmeric, you can use the powdered version.  However I managed to find some in my local asian market so it is available.  It looks a bit like ginger but is bright orange! It is also super good for you!

My PhotoFy_09_14_21_47

 One thing to be aware of with either the powdered or the fresh version…book a manicure for the day after you make your amok.  Otherwise your fingers will look like you smoke a pack a day for the foreseeable future! 

2014-09-14_09-40-19I”m off to have mine now!

Have a fabulous week everyone!

 

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PS.  They didn’t really give us a recipe for the Amok in the class.  My version below is heavily adapted from the one at taste.com.au.

RFFMT – Seafood Amok

RFFMT – Seafood Amok

Ingredients

  • 2 dried red chillies soaked in boiling water, drained, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh turmeric (can use powdered if not available)
  • 2 tablespoons grated galangal (can use ginger if not available)
  • 2 lemongrass stems (inner core only), grated
  • 2 eschalots, chopped
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon shrimp paste
  • 1/4 cup (65g) grated palm sugar
  • 6 kaffir lime leaves, finely shredded
  • 400ml coconut milk
  • 400g skinless blue-eye or other firm fleshed white fish, cut into 3-4cm pieces
  • 12 green prawns
  • 2 banana leaves
  • 1 long red chilli, thinly sliced
  • Rice or Naan Bread to serve

Instructions

  • Combine the chilli, garlic, turmeric, galangal, lemongrass, eschalot, lime zest, shrimp paste, palm sugar, half the kaffir lime leaves and 2 teaspoons salt in a mortar and pestle or small food processor and pound or whiz until a fine paste.
  • Transfer paste to a frypan over medium heat and cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes, until fragrant. Add the coconut milk and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat, transfer to a bowl and allow to cool slightly. Add the seafood and toss to combine.
  • Cut each banana leaf into two 25cm x 15cm rectangles. Carefully wave both sides of each leaf over a medium-high flame, then set aside (the heat from the flame will soften the leaves, making them more pliable). Lay each banana leaf out, divide the seafood among the leaves and fold in the ends, securing with toothpicks to form 4 small trays. Top with remaining marinade and sprinkle with remaining kaffir lime leaves and half the sliced chilli. Place in a steamer over medium-high heat and cook for 15 minutes or until the fish is tender and cooked through.
  • Place the seafood parcels on serving plates. Remove toothpicks and scatter with remaining sliced chilli. Serve with rice (traditional) or naan bread (because it's my favourite).
http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/2014/09/15/rffmt-running-amok-siem-reap/

 

 

 

Lets Get Chatty…Chatti Pathiri that is (Daring Kitchen)

Here is something you don’t know about me.  

Chatti Pathiri
Chatti Pathiri

You know how some people step up and excel under pressure?  I’m not one of them.  I warp.  I buckle.  I crumple and fold.  When the going gets tough you can usually find me sobbing in a corner.  And one of the things that really fazes me is cooking for other people – not so much for dinners but a bake sale?  Guaranteed disaster.  Last time?  Yes, that was me running into the 7-11 well after midnight, (after the first four attempts at cupcakes had failed) wild eyed, smeared with flour and frosting and slightly twitchy.  “Where’s your cake mix?  I need a box of cake mix.  And I need it now!!!!”  I was like a demented Betty Crocker junkie desperate for my fix…..

Chatting Pathiri

Sigh.

The April Daring Cooks Challenge was brought to us by Joanne from What’s On The List. She taught us all about Pathiri and challenged us to create our own version of this inspirational Indian dish! 

Challenge was right, I felt the first stirrings of panic rising even as I read the recipe….

Chatting Pathiri 2

So, let’s take a step back before I start hyperventilating (again) and look at this dish called Chatti Pathiri.  For those of you, who, like me had never heard of Chatti Pathiri, the best way to explain is that it’s kinda, sorta like an Indian Lasagne where crepes step in for the pasta sheet and, in my case a spicy chicken and chickpea curry acts as the filling.

Chatti Pathiri 3

Yeah, you heard it….yummy, yummy crepes and delicious chicken and chickpea curry.  And after you layer these two bits of deliciosuness, you slather them in coconut milk and bake it all together. And mark my words….It’s all good. 

So why the fear?  Why the cold hand of dread on my spine I hear you ask?  Not because of the recipe, that was awesome!!!  But because I kind of know Joanne.  She reads this.  She comments.  She’s a lovely, friendly delightful person.  And she has entrusted me (and yes,  ok thousands of other people on the Daring Kitchen) with a recipe that is obviously very special to her.  

And what if I took her delicious recipe and totally screwed it up? 

Arrrgggghhhhhh!!! 

The pressure….

(I know.  Such a Drama Queen.  Feel free to roll your eyes.  I would be.)

Luckily for me, Joanne’s recipe proved to be idiot proof!!!  And super delicious!!!! You can find it here.

I added a little bit more chilli and a can of chickpeas into the chicken mix but apart from that I used Joanne’s recipe as is.  

Chatti Pathiri
Chatti Pathiri

I served my version of Chatti Pathiri with a coconut and coriander sambol and some cherry tomatoes drizzled with a little bit of pomegranate molasses.

Coriander and Coconut Sambol
Serves 4
A spicy and refreshing side dish, perfect for eating with your Chatti Pathiri or any other indian dish
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Prep Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 3 tbsp coriander leaves
  2. 75g coconut (freshly grated is best, I used dessicated)
  3. 3 green chillies, deseeded
  4. 1 clove of garlic
  5. 2.5 cm piece of ginger
  6. 2 tsp mint leaves
  7. 1 tsp sugar
  8. Salt and freshly squeezed lime juice to taste
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients, except lime and salt in a food processor and process until finely chopped.
  2. Add salt and lime juice to taste.
  3. Serve as an accompaniment to curries
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
 The sambol will last in the fridge for about a week if you seal it up.  Which is perfect because the Chatti Pathiri is also pretty good reheated on the second day!!!

Joanne, if you’re reading this,  thank you very much for the recipe.  I loved making it and I loved eating it even more.  I hope I have done your recipe and you proud!!!

If this has piqued your interest in Pathiri and /or you would like to see how other Daring Kitchen members interpreted the challenge, you can see some of the completed dishes on Joanne’s blog here.

Or just head over and have a read, you won’t be disappointed!

And speaking of reading, I joined the Goodreads Food and Fiction book.  And here’s another thing you may not know about me – my first venture into blogging was trying to match food to the books I was reading.  It’s an idea I return to every now and again and I may start adding in one or two of those in the not too distant.  In the meantime, if, like me you love food and you love fiction…the Goodreads group may be something for you! You can find a link over on the right.

Have a great week!!!!

And if you want to get chatty, leave a comment!!!!

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Retro Food For Modern Times – Never Mind Eating For Beauty, This Week is All About the Love!

So last time we left off, I had been eating for love and beauty for 4 days and loving it.

However, through the week, I began to see a certain theme running through my dishes…

Day 5

I made two recipes from Eating for Love and Beauty.

The first was a delicious Egg Curry. 

Egg Curry
Egg Curry

This was very tasty, spicy and quick to make.  I will definitely make this again.  Also, I didn’t have fenugreek because…well who has?  However, I noticed my Garam Masala contained fenugreek, cumin and coriander so I used that in lieu of all individual spices.

Egg Curry
Egg Curry

I think we all know eggs are a symbol of fertility…I had my egg curry with a Rice Exotica – Saffron & Lime Casserole.
Rice Exotica huh?  I think the Swami might be getting a bit saucy!

Rice Exotica
Rice Exotica

Sadly, the Rice Exotica, was the least sexy dish of the week.  Probably because in my first mouthful of it, I bit directly into a clove which spoiled entire dish for me  Yes, it was my fault and I should have been more careful when I was counting them as I fished them out but still, not good.  I was also not happy with the texture and I only par boiled my rice initially!  I like my rice light and fluffy and this was a bit too mushy and stuck together for me.  I dread to think what it might have been like had I cooked it all the way through the first time as per the recipe.

If I was going to make the rice again, which is unlikely, I would probably not cook it at all before bunging it in the oven with the nuts and spices.  Hmmm…maybe I will try it that way.  Sans the cloves!

Next up was an Eggplant Dish….and lo and behold, the internet tells me that eggplants are a symbol of abundance or fertility, passion and devotion.  See what I mean about a theme beginning to develop?

Day 6 – Eggplant Gourmet

This was AWESOME!…

Earthy eggplant, sweet, sour..all sorts of deliciousness rolled into the one dish.  The flavours reminded me very much of a Sri Lankan Eggplant dish that sometimes contains cashew nuts…and maybe dates?

(Dear mother given you have started to chime in on here, maybe you could offer some insight into the constituents of an eggplant moju???)

Either way, I had some cashews left over from the Rice Exotica  so I dropped them in for extra flavour and crunch. I’m definitely making this again….

I also ate it more as a side dish than as a main.  It’s also pretty good cold on crackers or some tzatziki on pita bread.

Eggplant Gourmet
Eggplant Gourmet

Eggplant Gourmet Recipe

Day 6 – Lovers Dandelion Salad

If you’ve read my earlier post…(here)…you know I have a bit of a penchant for a bit of foraging.  So the Swami’s Lover’s Dandelion Salad was as good a reason as any to go comb the local environment for some dandelion leaves which, luckily, were plentiful.

I loved this salad.  There is something about bitter greens that makes me feel incredibly virtuous and just oozy with health! Again, I had no fenugreek sprouts so I just used a sprout combo.  I was becoming curious about why the Swami used fenugreek in so many dishes so I did a bit o’ research and hello…fenugreek is sometimes used to cure erectile dysfunction.

When the Swami wants you to eat for love, she doesn’t muck about!

She also says this salad is good for those suffering from mental or sexual debility.  I ate mine for lunch a the office and it kind of worked.  It certainly gave me a mental boost for the afternoon!

Lover's Dandelion Salad
Lovers Dandelion Salad

Lovers Dandelion Salad 0

Day 7 – 21 Essences of Kama Sutra

I followed the Lovers Dandelion Salad with the 21 Essences of Kama Sutra Salad although I guess I only had 19 Essences as I subbed a yellow pepper for the red and green peppers and could not find soy sprouts for love or money.  Then again, I used my handy sprout combo per the last recipe so maybe I had more than 21 Essences of Kama Sutra!   The Swami offers no comment on what the 21 Essences of Kama Sutra is good for.  I think she’s letting the name speak for itself.

21 Essences of Karma Sutra
21 Essences of Kama Sutra

This was also a very nice salad, although if I made this again, I wouldn’t bother with the Lotus Nuts. In the first pack I bought there were two dead moths.  That made me gag and I had to throw them out.  The second lot of lotus nuts was, thankfully, mothless but also largely tasteless.

I read on the internet Lotus Nuts are good for irritability.  Well guess what?  After the moths, and having to make two trips to the Asian food store to buy them, then finding they taste of sweet F.A. I guess they are.  I was certainly a lot more irritable after all that palaver than I was before I started!

And quelle surprise, also apparently good for impotence!

1 21 Essences Of  Kama Sutra

Day 8

It’s Plum Wonderful

I ended my week with the Swami’s recipe for an uncooked  Plum Pudding which is basically dried fruit held together with jello.    It’s really tasty, and has all the flavours of a plum pudding but is fruitier and not so heavy.  It would be a perfect alternative to a heavy pudding, particularly here when it is warm at Christmas.

Plum Wonderful 2
Plum Wonderful 2
Plum Wonderful 3
Plum Wonderful 3

Plum Wonderful Recipe

I recently read that a good maxim to use when trying to moderate your alcohol intake is to abstain one day a week, one week a month, one month a year.

It doesn’t work for me alcoholwise as I am aiming for far more than one AFD a week but it’s certainly a philosophy I can embrace when it comes to adopting the principles behind Eating For Love and Beauty.

That book, which also had a whole host of other good advice was:

Dangerous Women

Apart from the moths and the failure of the Rice Exotica, Eating For Love and Beauty has been fun and I feel really healthy.  It is winter here now and whilst people around me have been dropping like flies with all sorts of horrible lurgies, I  have never felt haler or heartier!

I really want to go to the Swami’s retreat now….

I’m going spend my week trying to find a yoga class I can do at lunchtime so I can exercise for health and beauty as well as eat for it. Enjoy your week whatever you do!

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