Category: Dessert

Profiteroles For Very Special Occasions

You might think that five and a bit years into this that I would cease to be surprised.  Both when things go awry and when by some stroke of mad luck things work out just as they should.  Such was the case with the Profiteroles I made on the weekend from the Very Special Occasions Chapter of The A- Z of Cooking (1977).  When the profiteroles came out of the oven looking like, well, profiteroles, there were whoops of joy, squeals of excitement and a bit of spontaneous kitchen dancing!

Yep, in this house, this:

Equals This:

http://www.laughinggif.com/view/ew0vxmklkk/56.htmlBut let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves just yet.  First.  Hello V.  And whilst we’re on the subject let’s’ all note the name of the chapter.  Not just Special Occasions.  Very Special Occasions.  Requiring very special dancing apparently.  And also requiring several goes at making something that was worthy of posting. After all, it’s a very special occasion. 

First up there was a go at Carpetbag Steak.  Now, if you lookup Carpetbag Steak anywhere on the interwebs, you will more than likely read that it is a famous  Australian recipe.  I’ve lived here virtually all my life and I have never head of it.  However, I really liked the idea of steak and oysters.  I made the recipe and it looked and tasted meh. 

Then I made a Beef Stroganoff.  Tasted good.  Looked terrible in all the photos.  I think it’s that thing that Jenny from Silver Screen Suppers told me about where brown food just doesn’t photo well.  This was about the best…

So then I made Carpetbag Steak v2.  A modern recipe this time.  Still looked and tasted meh.

I was left with a choice.  Champagne and Orange Juice.  Or Profiteroles.  And believe me . You came so close to having Champagne and Orange juice as your very special occasion meal.  Because this is what happens inside my head whenever pastry is mentioned:

https://giphy.com/gifs/bored-room-clean-clWd5ft31I23KThe profiteroles only happened because the very special occasion was a long weekend due to the Football Grand Final being the next day.  I know right.  Who has a holiday BEFORE the big day?

“It’s the dumbest reason for a holiday ever” I said.

“Come to work then” said my boss.

“It’s the best holiday ever.  Better even than Jesus being born.  Or dying.”

So anyway, on the holiday for best/ worst reason ever I got a little bored in the evening and thought that I would have a flick through The A-Z of Cooking, to plan V-Z.  The profiterole recipe caught my eye and  I realised that I had every ingredient.  And a whole heap of bravado due to being about 3/4 of a bottle of a wine in. 

Don’t judge.  That produced these.  Light as air, melt in the mouth, boozy cream filled and shiny chocolately pastry balls of deliciousness, 

The basis for profiteroles, and the reason for my hissy fit is pastry.  Choux pastry to be exact.  I have made choux pastry exactly once before.  For a recipe called Cherry Fritters from The A-Z of Cooking.  Don’t bother searching the archives for them.  They were a total disaster and I didn’t post them.

But choux starts with a roux…actually no. According to The A-Z of Cooking choux pastry starts with 63g of flour.  Yep.  63.  Not 60.  Not 65.  63.  And seeing as this was a very special occasion, 63g of flour it was.

Profiteroles5This became this:

Which became these.  I couldn’t find a piping bag and my piping skills are non-existent so I just blobbed spoonfuls of the pastry onto the tray.  Also, I wasn’t really expecting this to  work.  And need I remind you about that bottle of wine that was now 5/6’s gone?

Well, slap my arse and call me Charlie if those funny looking blobs didn’t turn into these.  They’re shall we say  “rustic” but on a scale of one to ten of  being recognizable as profiteroles, they have to be at least an eight.

Profiteroles 10So then fill and ice and sprinkle and you get these: (even more profiteroley).

Profiteroles 11

Here’s the recipe direct from The A-Z of Cooking:

Profiteroles 12I tweaked the recipe by swapping out the rum for Amaretto and adding some sprinkles.

Make, eat, enjoy, do a little dance of sheer pleasure. 

http://www.laughinggif.com/view/ew0vxmklkk/56.html

And have a great week!

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Future Classics – Australian Table – August 2001

Remember how I said I had a fab idea for a whole new series of blog posts whilst on holiday?  Here’s the thing, along with hundreds of cookbooks, I also have a huge collection of food magazines, most of which sit on shelves in my back room doing nothing.  Once a year, I grab a handful of the oldest, take them on holiday and cut out the recipes I want, throw away the magazines, and cook the recipes over the next 12 months. 

Vodka With Crushed Limes2

Crispy Duck with Green Pancakes2jpg

Currently I have a few mags from the late 1990’s but they are most from the early noughties onwards.  So they are not quite but well on their way to becoming formally vintage.  My thought on holiday was….”These are the things that will shortly become the vintage recipes of the future.  So, instead of ripping them up, I’m going to start cooking from them.  Once a month, I’ll revisit one of these magazines, cook a thing or two and decide if these are future vintage classics – or just junk taking up space in my backroom.  Here are the early years to 2013:

Magazines1And here are 2014 to the present day:

Magazines2so, to start, we are stepping back in time 15 years to the August 2001 edition of Australian Table:

Australian Table August 2001 I also thought it might be fun to revisit some of the content of these magazine as well as the recipes, so without further ado, here are the:

Flavours of The Month – August 2001

This section spoke about what was in season.  I thought I might give it a little Retro Food For Modern Times Twist!

Sweet Potatoes

Huh….my plan here was to insert a recipe or two from the blog.  However, apparently I have made nothing with sweet potatoes. I’ll link to some recipes  below.

Baby Bok Choy

Or anything with Bok choky.  What have I been cooking in for the last four years? 

Cumquats

Hooray – Finally!

Click here for my Four Kumquat Canapés For Four Food Heroes recipes

Pineapples

Melbourne Cup Crab and Pineapple Appetizer and MC Cocktail

Pineapple soufflé

Movies of The Month

Oh man.  August 2001 was a GOOD month for movies!  I would quite happily watch Bridget Jones’s Diary or Along Came a Spider today.  I don’t recall ever seeing Evolution but I am definitely putting that to rights, pronto.  I know it’s probably a little late with the picky picky however, Australian Table, I would like to point out that the chocolate-voiced, sloe-eyed maverick investigator is actually called Alex Cross.  The ACTOR is Morgan Freeman.  And what a difference a letter makes.  Slow-eyed which I typed at least a dozen times in the above paragraph makes you sound like you should be taking special classes.  Sloe-eyed…hello sexy!

Movies - August 2001

Music Of The Month

Well, I guess you can’t have it all.  I listened to none of these at the time nor do i have any real desire to seek out any of these.  Maybe the Elvis Costello.

Music August 2001

The Food

I chose two recipes from an article on fool proof party food starting with:

Vodka with Crushed Limes

Australian Table August 2001These are my flavours…this was so good!  Tangy, sweet delicious!

Crispy Duck with Green Scallion Pancakes

Crispy Duck with Green PancakesNo, these are my flavours!  Spicy, seductive!

Australian Table August 20012

Berry and Rhubarb Crumble

This recipe came from an advertisement for a 3 in one hand blender.  Crumble is pretty much already a classic but the addition of rhubarb instead of the more traditional apple?  Genius!

Rhubarb and Berry CrumbleRhubarb and Berry Crumble Recipe

Everything I made from this mag was SUPER! My view is that this is a definite future vintage classic!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little walk down memory lane!  I’ll be back in a couple of weeks with a mag from September 2001.  I hope it’s as good as this one!

Have a great week!

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Bourbon Brigade Pudding

Coming back to Melbourne in winter after a tropical holiday has been a shock to the system.  I’m not sure if it is the cold or getting back onto germ-laden public transport but I have come down with a whopper of a cold.  Sore throat, blocked nose, and a head that feels like it is about to explode.  When I have not been in bed this weekend, I have been craving comfort food and what better way to rally one’s flagging spirits than with a Brigade Pudding.  And not just any Brigade Pudding but a Bourbon laced Brigade Pudding!  Because alcohol kills germs right?

Brigade Pudding 3To quote The Rolling Stones “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you just might find, you get what you need”. Such was the case with the recipe for Brigade Pudding.  There I was flicking feebly through the A-Z of Cooking, trying to muster the energy to get out of bed / the house / my sense of lethargy.  And to quote Marcy Playground (who knew illness would bring out my musical side, or maybe it was those weeks of Balinese cover bands).

“And then there it  was, Like double cherry pie, Yeah there it was, Like disco superfly, ”

Right in the  sweet spot of L (Leave it to Cook) in the A-Z of Cooking, Brigade Pudding.

Definitely what I needed!

Brigade Pudding 4Not even the Lemon Pond Pudding debacle of last year was going to stop me from making the Brigade Pudding.  Yes, the number of suet puddings I have made  to date is 1 and the number of failures I have had making suet puddings is also 1 but due to that disaster and a yet untouched bottle of fruit mince from a Christmas hamper I also had all the ingredients for the Brigade Pudding in the house.  No need to shop!  Yay to making food in one’s pyjamas! Yay to comfort food!  Yay to The A-Z of Cooking providing just what you need!

Brigade Pudding 1I am not sure which Brigade, if any, the Brigade Pudding was named after.  I did some cursory research but please see above for head that feels like it is about to explode.  What I can tell you is that it consists of layers of  apple and fruit mince sandwiched together by layers of suet pastry and then steamed to pudding perfection.  I added a little Trans Atlantic twist to my Brigade Pudding by adding in a good splash of bourbon into some warmed golden syrup to help give that  lovely shiny glaze and also allowed my apple and fruit mince to soak in another good splash of bourbon whilst the pastry chilled in the fridge.

Brigade Pudding RecipeThe verdict?  The Fussiest Eater in the World who grew up with stodgy British suet puddings loved it!  My opinion was not quite so positive.  Personally, I found the suet pastry  a bit heavy going.  I would have preferred the apple, fruit and bourbon mix with a lighter sponge pudding. He also liked it as is,  whilst I really thought it needed a little something-something to go with it.  Custard would have been super but we didn’t have any.  What we did have some was some of Sabrina Ghayour’s Pistachio, Honey and Orange Blossom Ice Cream which gave it just the lift I felt it needed.  Pudding perfection!  I also love that combination of hot pudding and cold ice cream! So good.

Bourbon Brigade Pudding
Serves 6
A lovely old fashioned British Pudding. Perfect comfort food for a winter night!
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For The Pastry
  1. 200g self raising flour
  2. pinch of salt
  3. 100g shredded suet or butter
  4. water
For The Filling
  1. 4 tbsp golden syrup
  2. 1/4 cup bourbon
  3. 200g mincemeat
  4. 3 large cooking apples, peeled, cored, grated
Instructions
  1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and add the suet or butter. Rub in well then add enough water to make a soft dough. Leave this to chill in the fridge for around an hour.
  2. Put the golden syrup in a small pan and gently heat with half the bourbon. Set aside.
  3. Take your pudding bowl and place it on a piece of baking paper, small side down. Trace around the bowl and cut the paper to size. Then, turn it over so the widest part of the bowl is on the papder. Cut three circles this size. You will now have one small circle and three large. Trim two of the large circles down so you now have four circles of varying sizes.
  4. Mix the mincemeat, the apples and the rest of the bourbon and allow to sit for half an hour so the flavours can develop.
  5. Grease the pudding bowl and our the golden syrup & bourbon mixture into the bottom, swirl around so it coats the sides.
  6. Now, roll pastry out thinly. Using your paper circles as templates, cut four circles from the pastry. Place the smallest in the pudding bowl and top with a third of the apple and mincemeat mixture. Repeat until all the apple is mixture is used, topping with the largest circle of pastry.
  7. Cover the basin with greased paper and foil tied on with string.
  8. Steam over boiling water for 2.5 hours.
  9. Serve with custard or ice cream.
Adapted from The A-Z of Cooking, 1977
Adapted from The A-Z of Cooking, 1977
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
 Have a wonderful week! 

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Speedy Soufflé for Valentines Day

I made my very first soufflé.  For you, for Valentine’s Day.  

And it’s filled with passion – fruit.

Passionfruit Souffle 3Passionfruit Souffle 9

I’m not sure why it has taken me so long to make a soufflé.  I have some vague childhood memories of eating cheese soufflés and them not being very nice.  Then again, I ate nothing for two years except vegemite sandwiches so my judgement was possibly awry.  But those memories and the soufflé’s reputation for being notoriously temperamental might be the reasons I have stayed away.  After all, the soufflé come with more rules and regulations than the driving handbook:

  • Don’t beat the eggs too little
  • Don’t beat the eggs too much
  • Don’t fold the egg whites too roughly
  • Don’t open the door of the oven
  • Don’t make loud noises or sudden movements
  • Don’t look it directly in the eyes

Etc, etc.

What they don’t tell you is this.  You can have a decent souffle cooked from scratch and on the table in less than 20 minutes. So let’s get started. 

Butter and sugar coat your soufflé dish.  When you butter your dish, brush the butter from the middle of the dish to the rim and then up the sides of the dish.  This creates tiny channels that helps the soufflé to rise.   Seriously this works.

Passionfruit Souffle

When you are ready to start mix your egg yolk, half the sugar and the passionfruit juice in a bowl until light and creamy. 

Then mix your egg white and sugar to soft peaks.

Passionfruit Souffle 5Then fold the yolk into the white.  Gently does it here.  A little streaky is fine.  Then pour into your prepared soufflé dish.

Passionfruit Souffle 6

Now, into a preheated oven for 12 minutes.  So we’re not tempted to open that door and ruin our “ahem” hard work, let’s talk about romance.  After all it is Valentine’s Day.

The last few Valentine’s Days I have given you some horror stories.  Not so this year.  This year we are talking about two very special romantic moments in my life. 

Let’s start with my first ever boyfriend.  We started going out when I was 15 and he was 16.  There was a local park we used to frequent to get away from prying parental eyes and ears.  So, one Sunday afternoon we rode our bikes down to said park and headed towards our favourite bench to have a kiss and a cuddle.  We had not been there long when, from down the hill we heard some children screaming “Help, help, Angus has fallen in the lake”. 

Passionfruit Souffle 7Well, he took off down that hill, and jumped in, fully clothed  to save what we assumed was a drowning child.  Turned out Angus was a labrador puppy who had been quite happy paddling around in the shallows and had not even noticed the distress of his young owners. Semi disaster averted and there was a little swoony dripping wet with tight tshirt moment.  Made only more adorable by the squirming puppy in his arms!

Young love.  My hero.  And a puppy.  Life did not get much better!

Passionfruit Souffle 8So move forward…..a few decades years to the fussiest eater in the world.  A few weeks ago we were walking the dogs by the lake and noticed that one of the ducks had become entangled in some fishing wire and was only able to move in a tiny circle.  And cue the second Mr Darcy moment of my life. 

Passionfruit Souffle 11

Not only did he jump into the lake (it was only calf deep so no wet shirt here) but he unwound the fishing line from the duck’s leg then we noticed there was also some line knotted around it’s beak and neck. It was really knotted and tight he ended up having to bite through it!  It was both amazing and kind of gross.  That lake water is pretty dirty and I was expecting him to get sick from swallowing even a little bit of it. (He didn’t). 

These moments may not have involved hearts and roses but for me were two of the most generous spirited and selfless acts I have seen.  And that is true romance!

Passionfruit Souffle 10

OK, our 12 minutes is up and the soufflé is out of the oven.  Quickly dust with icing sugar, add a  dollop of passionfruit pulp over the top and serve immediately.  Your souffé will start to deflate from the time it comes out of the oven so speed is of the essence here.

Passionfruit Souffle 9

Have a wonderful Valentine’s day!  And don’t forget to spare a moment to moment to say thank you to the everyday heroes in your life, the people saving dogs and ducks and generally making the world a better place.  If you have a spare 15 minutes  why not make them a soufflé?

And then tell me when the love heart lollies of our childhood took a step into the digital age?  Not only are they now using Twitter….

Passionfruit Souffle 12

But also Tinder!

Passionfruit Souffle 13

Swipe left on that!

Passionfruit Souffle
Serves 2
A delicious passionfruit souffle that can be on the table in about 15 minutes!
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Prep Time
4 min
Cook Time
12 min
Prep Time
4 min
Cook Time
12 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 egg, separated
  2. 21/2 tbsp caster sugar
  3. 1 can passionfruit in syrup, you will need 1 tbsp of syrup
  4. icing sugar to dust
  5. melted butter to grease the souffle dish
  6. 1 8cm souffle dish
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 180C.
  2. Butter the souffle dish, spreading the butter from the middle of the dish up the sides. Scatter a tablespoon of sugar into the dish tipping it all around the insides until it is entirely covered.
  3. Strain the passionfruit syrup into a dish, you will need a tablesppon of liquid. Reserve the seeds for later.
  4. Place the syrup with the egg yolk and half a tablespoon of sugar into a bowl and beat with an electric beater until light and creamy.
  5. In a separate bowl beat the egg white to soft peaks, then add the remaining sugar, a little at a time until the mixture is glossy and holding it's shape.
  6. Using a metal spoon, fold the whites into the yolks. A light touch is needed here, you want to keep as much air in the mixture as possible. It is better to have the mixture a bit streaky than to have it over mixed!
  7. Spoon the mixture into the prepared dish to just below the rim then run your thumb around the rim to totally clear it of any sugar, souffle mix etc that will prevent rising.
  8. Pop the dish onto a baking tray and bake for 12 minutes.
  9. Do not open the oven during this time.
  10. Remove from oven. They are done when a finger touched lightly on the top comes away clean but there is still a slight wobble in the middle.
  11. Quickly dust with icing sugar and add a dollop of the reserved passionfruit seeds and some additional syrup.
  12. Serve immediately.
Adapted from taste.com.au
Adapted from taste.com.au
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/

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White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake

Back in….oh I don’t know, JULY my mum posted a recipe on my Facebook page and said, “This is what you are making for Christmas Day Lunch”.  Which is fine, it certainly stopped me from disappearing down the rabbit hole of suitable dessert recipes – which is all too easy for me to do. 

There was one minor problem though.  The recipe was a Tim Tam Cheesecake.  So what’s the problem I hear you ask?

I love chocolate. 

I love cheesecake. 

I do NOT like a chocolate cheesecake.  I really do not like chocolate cheesecake. Even the thought of it makes me a little nauseated. 

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam CheesecakeLuckily I had a good 5 months to think about how I could fulfill the brief of both a Tim Tam Cheesecake and something I would want to eat.  

Eventually,  I came  up with the idea of using the White Chocolate Tim Tams.  I also substituted raspberries for the chocolate in the filling.

And voila…

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam CheesecakePeople loved this.  And, having the biscuits like that around the outside, made it super easy to cut and serve!

Oh, and if you noticed a familiar name on the plate, it was painted by my mum.  If you didn’t, here it is again:

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake5And yes, we may have some fancy pants hand painted serving platters but when it comes to dishing up, we’re not afraid to use disposables.  Life’s too short to be doing dishes on Christmas Day right?

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake3The Tim Tam Cheesecake is easy to make, looks very special, and tastes deee-licious!!!!

If you are not averse to a regular chocolate cheesecake, here is the recipe I based my cheesecake on:

https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/new-idea/recipes/r/24716105/tim-tam-cheesecake/

If you cannot find Tim Tams, (poor you!!!!!) any similar style biscuit could be used.  Here is a link to a description of a Tim Tam:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Tam

And here is a recipe to make your own:

http://www.sugarhero.com/homemade-tim-tams/

Ok, now that you have your Tim Tams, and you will need three packs of them, put a pack of them (after removing the wrapper) in your food processor and grind them down. The original recipe called for some butter to be added to the crumb crust.   I did not need any.  Between the cream filling and the white chocolate on the outside and possibly that I made it on the hottest day of the year, the processed Tim Tams did not so much make a crumb but, for want of a better word, a thick sludge, that could be pressed into the pan base without adding butter.  And believe me, this is rich enough without more butter. 

White Chocolate Cheesecake CrumbSpread your Tim Tam “crumb” mix into the base of your prepared tin.  Open another pack of Tim Tams and press these into the base, standing them up to line the sides of the tin.

White Chocolate and Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake BaseThe filling is a fairly standard cream cheese, white chocolate, and cream affair.  The raspberries not only add colour but they help to cut through the somewhat cloying sweetness of the white chocolate.  

An additional bonus of this wonderful dessert is that you need to make it the day before.  So, on the day of your festivity, all you need to do is slice and serve.  One less thing to stress over on the big day is a huge bonus in my book!

White Chocolate & Raspberry Tim Tam Cheesecake
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Base
  1. 3 x 200g packets White Chocolate Tim Tams
  2. up to 50g unsalted butter, melted
Filling
  1. 2 x 250g blocks cream cheese, at room temperature
  2. ¼ cup caster sugar
  3. 2 x 180g blocks white cooking chocolate, melted
  4. 300ml tub thickened cream, whipped
  5. 250g raspberries, frozen are fine just thaw them out beforehand
Base
  1. Line a 24cm round spring form pan (base measuring 22cm) with cling film, extending over the outside of pan.
  2. Process 1 pack of Tim Tams in a food processor until finely crushed. If you need to add butter to help the mixture stick together (I didn't) add it a teaspoon at a time until the mixture holds together.
  3. Press evenly over base of prepared pan.
  4. Line side of pan with Tim Tams.
  5. Refrigerate.
Filling
  1. Beat cheese and sugar in a large bowl of an electric mixer until light and fluffy.
  2. Beat in cooled melted white chocolate.
  3. Don't worry if the mixture looks curdled, keep beating and it will come right. Continue to beat until smooth. Fold in cream until just combined.
  4. If using frozen raspberries, drain off any excess liquid from the frozen raspberries. Lightly fold the raspberries through the cheese mixture.
  5. Spoon into the prepared pan. Smooth over top.
  6. Refrigerate, covered, overnight.
To Serve
  1. Remove side of pan. Slide onto a serving plate.
  2. Cut between biscuits into slices.
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
 I left the top of my cheesecake unadorned because I liked the swirly, splotchy look of the raspberries.  If you wanted to be really fancy you could decorate with more cream, raspberries or crumbled Tim Tams.

Enjoy!

Have a great week!

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