Bangers Bolognese – Recipe Remedy

The original recipe for Bangers Bolognese comes from the Time Saving Tips Chapter of The A-Z of Food (1977).  I  wanted to make it purely for the name alone. The British habit of calling sausages bangers is adorable even if the origin  of the name is kind of unsavoury.  According to the ever reliable (ahem) Wikipedia, meat shortages during World War One lead to sausages being made with such a low meat content and such a high water content that they would sometimes explode when cooked.  They were literally bangers!   Best not to ask what actually went into them…..

The A-Z recipe for Bangers Bolognese was kind of gross though.  Chopped up sausages…oops, bangers in a sauce made out of tinned tomato soup. I have an aversion to tinned tomato soup stemming back from school days.  One time (not at band camp)  my school tuck shop ran out of ketchup and instead of buying more, used tinned tomato soup as the condiment for the day.  It was disgusting!  And put me off tinned tomato soup for life!

Bangers Bolognese2

So, I thought, what would happen if I took the idea of Bangers Bolognese but omitted the awful tomato soup component for something a bit more amenable to the modern palate? The result is a recipe remedy which is absolutely delicious!

Bangers Bolognese1I used chorizo for my bangers but feel free to use your favorite sausage.  Without wanting to sound too snooty about it, this is really a recipe where using the highest quality of sausage you can afford will result in a better tasting dish. 

Here’s the original for anyone that cares to eat sausages cooked in tomato soup:

Bangers Bolognese OriginalBefore we get to my tweaked version of Bangers Bolognese, lets take a trip in the way back machine to 1968 when Margaret Fulton had to show the unworldly Australian public how to twirl spaghetti like an urbane Italian.  Beware though, the next set of photos contain both werewolfy hairy arms and super pointy 1960’s nails. 

You have been warned.

Okay, so now you know how to twirl pasta like a pro lets update this beast.  No tomato soup in sight!

Bangers Bolognese
A delicious and time saving take on a traditional spaghetti bolognese, using sausages
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Ingredients
  1. 4 high quality sausages of your choice, the spicier the better
  2. 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  3. 1 brown onion, finely chopped
  4. 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  5. 1 sprigs of thyme
  6. 1 sprig of rosemary
  7. 1/2 cup red wine
  8. 400g can tomatoes
  9. 1 tbsp brown sugar
  10. 400g spaghetti
  11. Cheese - parmesan is traditional however for extra creaminess, Donna Hay suggests using Buffalo Mozzarella
  12. Parsley and additional chilli flakes to garnish.
Instructions
  1. Remove the casings from the sausages.
  2. Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the sausages, chilli, onion and garlic and cook for 5 minutes or until the onions and garlic are softened.
  3. Add the wine, tomatoes, sugar and herbs.
  4. Reduce the heat to low and bring to a simmer.
  5. Cover with a lid and cook for 1/2 and hour or longer until the sauce is reduced.
  6. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a large saucepan of boiling salted water until al dente.
  7. Drain well.
  8. Toss the pasta with the bolognese mixture, top with cheese, parsley and chilli flakes.
Adapted from The A-Z of Food & Donna Hay
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
Bangers Bolognese 7Have a wonderful week . I’ll be back next time with another recipe remedy from The A-Z of Cooking.

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Tiny Waldorf Salads

Is there a salad both more famous (and more mangled) than the Waldorf Salad?  I doubt it.  And because, pretty much since it’s inception, people have been mucking around with it, I thought I would put my stamp on it.  As I have a predilection for little food, I shrank my Waldorf Salad into individual serving sizes.

Waldorf Salad1Waldorf Salad – History

The Waldorf Salad was first made at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1896 and was, a huge success.  The original recipe only contained apples, celery and mayonnaise  The grapes and walnuts came later but are now considered integral ingredients.

The Waldorf precedes the other classic “American” salad, the Caesar, by 28 years. 

The Waldorf Salad was also immortalised in an episode of Fawlty Towers.  I wonder if this is the only salad to ever have a sit com episode named after it.  If you have not seen this you must.  It is hilarious.  But here’s a taste!

So, celery, apples, walnuts grapes…in a mayonnaise sauce.  Which is pretty much what mine consisted of. 

Waldorf Salad2So how did they manage to get it so wrong in the ’60’s? 

Well, the top three reasons of what went wrong in the 60’s in general are:

  1. Charlie Manson
  2. Massive amounts of drug taking
  3. Gelatine

Now,Manson may be all kinds of crazy but I don’t think we can blame him for this:

Retro Waldorf via Bon AppetitOr this (even though this is kind of pretty)

california-waldorf-salad-gelatin-mold via bon appetitOr, Good Lord, even this:

Retro Waldorf SaladNope, the blame for that lies squarely with 3).  Possibly with a large dose of 2) thrown in

After those horrors i totally understand why the poor old Waldorf Salad is not nearly as popular today as the Caesar salad. The graphs below show internet interest in the words as search terms. 


Kind of makes me wonder why I am bothering to post on Waldorf when it’s so unpopular.  Next week – Caesar Salad! And hit city!

The thing is, Caesar salad  is often awful and the Waldorf salad tasted good.  It’s crunchy and crisp and sweet and nutty.  Nothing wrong there.  The buttermilk dressing I used adds a little tang without being too cloying.  It’s delicious.  And easy to make.  And healthy.  And it’s fun to wrap up the main ingredients in a lettuce leaf like a salady sang choy bau.

What more do you need?

Go and make one now.  You already know how….it’s celery, apples, walnuts grapes…in a mayonnaise sauce.

Pop it all into a lettuce leaf, wrap it up and enjoy!

Waldorf Salad5

Tiny Waldorf Salads
My take on the classic Waldorf Salad
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Salad Ingredients
  1. 2 red apples cored and thinly sliced
  2. 1/2 lemon, juiced
  3. 16 small butter lettuce or cos leaves
  4. 2 celery stalks, thinly sliced on the diagonal
  5. 45 g(¼ cup) seedless grapes, halved
  6. 45 g(¼ cup) walnuts, toasted and chopped
Dressing Ingredients
  1. 3/4 cup buttermilk
  2. 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  3. 1/2 lemon, juiced
  4. Salt and pepper
For The Salad
  1. Sprinkle the apple with lemon juice to stop it from browning.
  2. Place the lettuce leaves on a serving platter and top with the apples, celery, grapes and walnuts.
For The Dressing
  1. Mix the buttermilk, mayonnaise and lemon juice.
  2. Season to taste.
To Serve
  1. Roll up the lettuce leaves to enclose the filling.
  2. Drizzle with, or dip into the dressing.
  3. Enjoy!
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
 Have a wonderful week!

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Cheery Cherry Sangria

This post’s name came from the fact that I totally read the name of this recipe incorrectly.  More than once.  I swear, the first four times looked at it I  thought it was called Cheery Sangria.  I even wrote it that way on my “meal” planner.  Cheery Sangria.  It was only when I was writing the ingredients on my shopping list that I paused.  “Oh.  It has cherries in it.  That’s cute, they made a pun.”  Well, it turns out, they didn’t.  But I did.  And we all know how much I love that!  So, technically what we’re drinking today is CHERRY sangria.  But you know what?  It brought a touch of the sun and warmth of Portugal into a totally cold, wet and grey Melbourne winter day so I think Cheery Sangria works just as well!!

Yes, I’m back from holiday.  And determined to make Sangria my drink of choice for this summer. It’s just so good!!! Wine and fruit and a little bit o the hard stuff….it really doesn’t get much better.  Mind you, summer has to come first.  And at the moment, it seems a long time away. 

The best Sangria I had overseas was in Portugal – a teeny cafe in Faro.  Here I am drinking one….

SangriaThe Portuguese,they are a people after my own heart. They have a cherry liqueur called Ginja which is commonly drunk for breakfast.  Speaking of which…when the breakfast buffet contains both Portuguese egg tarts and sparkling wine, I know I have found my people!

Sangria 5

Cheery times!  And cheersy times!!!  But now onto some cherry times.

The cherry sangria I made is pretty hearty.  It has loads of strong, spicy flavours which made it suitable for a cold winter’s day.  I also totally forgot to add the cinnamon stick but that would have only made it even better!  The gorgeous deep red colour is also so pretty and warming.  I also used cherries and sparkling wine to remind me of the Portuguese breakfast drinks of Ginja and cava!

But let’s start with some fruit.  Limes, blood oranges and, of course cherries make for a tasty and colourful combination!

Cherry Sangria2Then add some tequila for a kick, grenadine for sweetness and a teeny taste of Tabasco for spice and muddle the fruit to get some juicy, fruity flavours.  (Pre-muddle is also when the cinnamon should have been added).

Sangria3Top with orange juice and some sparkling red wine…and voila…cherry sangria!

Sangria4Salud!

 

Cherry Sangria
A hearty sangria, perfect for bringing the warmth of Portugal into the coldest winter's day.
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Ingredients
  1. 500ml chilled sparkling shiraz (you can also use non-sparkling shiraz)
  2. 500ml chilled orange juice
  3. 2 tbsp tequila
  4. 2 tbsp grenadine
  5. splash of Tabasco sauce
  6. 1 cinnamon stick
  7. 500g cherries
  8. 2 limes, cut into eigths
  9. 2 blood oranges, sliced
  10. Mint leaves to garnish
Instructions
  1. Place the lime wedges and the slices from one of the oranges into your jug. Add half the cherries. Halve the remaning cherries and add them to the rest of the fruit.
  2. Add the cinnamon stick, grenadine, tequila and tabasco
  3. Muddle the fruit to express some of the juices.
  4. Add the orange juice and sparkling shiraz and stir well.
  5. Place a slice of orange and a few mint leaves in each glass and pour the sangria over.
  6. Serve immediately.
  7. Olé!
Adapted from Australian Table Magazine, December 2001 edition
Adapted from Australian Table Magazine, December 2001 edition
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
Sangria6

 

Have a great week! 

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Cattle Country Salad for Cowboy Day

Go west they said.  I took their advice and not only went  west but a whole heap north as well to end  up in the UK for this year’s Cowboy Day.  I will be spending the actual day in the most haunted town in Britain! Maybe a ghost cowboy just like this one will appear on the day….

Spooky huh?

Something that is not at  all spooky is the  Cattle Country Beef Salad Salad l made to celebrate Cowboy day.  But first, this is the first time I am writing, editing,  and posting entirely via phone so let’s put any weirdness in this post, beyond the regular  weirdness down to that and I will re-edit, format as required once I get home!

Cattle Country Beef SaladWe don’t have cowboys in Australia.  We have cattlemen.  Who live in cattle country which is where this salad comes from.  Actually, it comes from Rosemary Mayne-Wilson’s Salads for All Seasons but you know what I mean.

So what all goes into a Cattle Country Beef Salad?

  1. Beef of course.  I suspect originally this would have been leftovers from the Sunday roast but I just bought from slices of roast beef from the supermarket. 
  2. Then there’s apples.  Because we all know one a day keeps the doctor away and you don’t want to get sick while you’re out riding the range.  
  3. There’s celery because…I dunno. What use is celery?  I like the taste of it but….oh that’s right.  Celery keeps the cattlemen skinny.  Because no one likes a tubby cowboy.  Specially the horses they ride around on all day.
  4. Spring onions.  To put a spring in their step.  

That was about it for the original ingredients.  I also added some mixed leaves because I had to use them before I left for the UK the following morning.  I also added some chunks of a lovely vintage cheddar.  Which also had to be used but cheese also makes anything taste better and this was no exception.

RMW suggests using a French dressing for this.  Make it really punchy by being HEAVY on the mustard.  The flavours in here are strong enough to deal with it. 

Cattle Country  Beef Salad 2This was yummy!!!! Quick simple delicious.  That’s an all round winner for me!  

Here’s the original recipe:

Okay, I’m trying to keep this short and sweet because posting off the phone is doing my head in.  

Many thanks to Greg from Recipes for Rebels for inviting me to participate in the cookalong again this year.  It is always a so much fun to be a part of something like this.  Plus, he”s one of the most awesome people on the internet so should just be thanked in general 

 I dont have my regular sign off this week but just look what can happen when bloggers get together.  For an explanation of why Battenberg Belle, Jenny Hammerton and I are wearing cowboy hats and clutching a meat cleaver, a melon baller and a hammer respectively, you’ll need to head over to Silver Screen Suppers but in the meantime, have a great Cowboy Day everyone!  

Sickeningly Good Chicken Chowder

Huh…in case you’re wondering why it’s two for one day here at RFFMT, it’s because I only realised that I hadn’t posted this recipe for Chicken Chowder which I wrote weeks ago, when I went to post my Pieathalon recipe.  So here is my belated Chicken Chowder.

Enjoy!

The A-Z of Cooking has not been kind to me recently.  So, even though I  LOVE soup and we are in the middle of winter so it’s perfect soup weather, I had my hesitations about trying something from the chapter called “Soups to Make a Meal”.  There were three options.  Lentil Soup, Minestrone and Chicken Chowder.  I feel like I  just made George Harrison’s Dark House Lentil Soup, the picture of the minestrone looked vile – and the recipe called for weird inclusions like turnips, parsnips  and swedes which have their place (which is mostly in the garbage) but never in a minestrone.  Not on my watch anyway.  So Chicken Chowder it was.  

At the time, i wasn’t overly concerned that there were no photos of the said chicken chowder.  You can’t photograph everything right?  Well, not in 1977 anyway.  As I was to find out, the omission quite possibly had more to do with a factor of the chicken chowder rather than any sort of 1970’s austerity measure.

Chicken Chowder 1

Before we get to the lows, let’s talk about life (and soup) highs.  I was immensely proud and somewhat baffled by being named one of Feedspot’s Top 100 food bloggers of 2017.  I’m still waiting for an email saying something along the lines of “Sorry Ms Fryer, there has been a terrible mistake and we have dealt with the offenders appropriately”  but in the meantime?  I’m doing a happy dance!

Awwwwww……he wasn’t even my President and I miss him to death!  How adorable is his happy dance?  And that cheeky little smile at the end?  Too.  Much. 

But I digress.  Chicken Chowder.  The highs.  This tasted deeeee – licious.  It was everything you want in a hearty winter soup.  Tasty, thick, creamy, filled with chicken and veg…..perfect comfort food to combat the cold weather blues!

Chicken Chowder 2So much for the highs.  What they don’t tell you in food blogging school…or maybe they do, I wouldn’t know, is that sometimes, things that taste really good – (Souper anyone?  Anyone?  Am I ladleing it on too thick?  Do I need to take stock?) sometimes just look a little bit shit when you try to photograph them.  Which is why I spent WAAAAAAAYYYYY   too many hours trying not to make my chicken chowder look like big bowls of vom.

Oh.  My.  Lord.  

The very things that made the chicken chowder delicious – creamy, chunky, diced veg….all combined to make the first….hmmm…let’s say 20 photos….. all look like someone had just thrown up rather neatly into a plate.  I really, really hope that the photos I ended up with don’t share that attribute.  But just in case you think I exaggerating, I will post one of the early versions right at the end.  Kind of makes me think that The A-Z of Cooking knew what it was doing when it conveniently didn’t have a photo of this hot mess!

Chicken Chowder 3

I used carrots, leeks and potatoes as my root vegetables.  Otherwise, here is the recipe direct from 1977!

Chicken Chowder Recipe

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  Ye of faint stomachs, look away now…here is one of vomitous photos.  

What a difference a bowl makes!

Chicken Chowder 4

 

 

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