Tag: Soup

Dark House Lentil Soup – Celebrity Cooking inspired by Circus Magazine #1

When we were in Bali earlier this year,  we visited the The Fire Station in Sanur a couple of times.  The first time we went I had a blue cheese, rocket (arugula) and pear salad that was to die for.  The second time we both had the burgers which were awesome!

Fire Station Sanur - BurgerOne of the features of The Fire Station is that the walls are COVERED in celebrity photos. 

The Fire Station - Sanur

And I became utterly obsessed with one of them.  It was a cover from Circus Magazine from February 1970. My photo was a bit crappy so here is a copy I found on the internet. 

Can you imagine ANY magazine today placing 20 celebrities on their cover and asking which of them are likely to die of drug overdoses in the next ten years? Because unless they thought Logan’s Run was a documentary and people over 30 would actually get rounded up and shot, this is exactly what they are suggesting!

One of the first things I did when I got home was to google to see if it was a real magazine cover.  As far as I can ascertain this actually was the cover of Circus Magazine in February 1970.  

There are a few people featured on the list who I was a) either not sure who they were or b) not sure if they were still alive.  So I started doing a bit of Googling.  The very first person I looked up had a recipe.  The second had a recipe named after them.  The more I looked the more I found. 

So, to save you the same effort I went to, here is the first part of my research.

Johnny Cash

The Man in Black survived the ’70’s but sadly passed away on September 12 2003.

The wonderful Jenny Hammerton over at Silver Screen Suppers has  made Johnny Cash’s Chili Recipe.  You can find it here

In a piece of weirdness that I have yet to fathom, the magazine cover quite clearly states both that:

  • These people are approaching 30 and,
  • Johnny Cash is 37

So either JC had some weird Benjamin Button thing going on, or he’d mastered the art of backwards time travel.  If anyone else has also mastered this skill, please let me know.  I’d very much like to be approaching 30 again too!

Bob Dylan

Still going strong at 75!

The Clever Pup has featured a recipe by Bob Dylan’s mother.  Here it is:

Beatty Zimmerman’s Banana Chocolate Chip Loaf Bread. 

Alvin Lee

Was one of the people I had never heard of.  He was the lead vocalist and lead guitarist of the blues rock band Ten Years After who I have also never heard of.  I couldn’t find a recipe by or about him. All I know is that he was a man not afraid to pout.

Alvin Lee survived the 70’s passing away at the age of 68 in 2013.

George Harrison

My favourite Beatle and creator of this week’s recipe Dark House Lentil Soup.  And what a superb photo of him!

The soup was a huge hit in this house!  I love lentil soup.  The Fussiest Eater in the world?  Not so much.  He has been known to mutter  things like “You know what would make this soup better?  Bacon” when I have made different versions of lentil soup.  I was heading out for a night with the girls this week and told him “There’s some lentil soup in the fridge if you don’t want to cook”.  I got an eyeroll and a less than enthusiastic “Great”. However, by the time I got home the response was a far warmer, “That soup was excellent!  Can I take some to work?”

Thank you George Harrison, you’ve converted TFEITW to being a lentil soup lover. 

Sadly George Harrison passed away from cancer on 29 November 2001. 

Pete Townshend

For many a year, I was absolutely OBSESSED with Mod Culture and The Who in the Quadrophenia era so I am a big fan of the work of Mr Townshend. 

I was able to find a recipe attributed to The Who in Cool Cooking by Roberta Ashley. 

Roberta says that “flashy drummer, Keith Moon..is recognised by critics as one of the best drummers in the business.  He’s also the one really into food.  He owns a pub called the Crown and Cushion. a  converted 16th century coach house…you can even find Keith there working as a bartender occasionally….One of the specialties of the house and a favourite of all The Who is Burnt Sugar Pudding:

scan_20160912

Pete Townshend is still very much alive and kicking and living in London.  Keith Moon, on the other hand, did not survive the ’70’s.  He died on 7 September 1978 of an overdose, somewhat ironically from Heminevrin, a drug used to treat symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.  The Crown and Cushion is still going and it looks absolutely gorgeous. I’ve already earmarked it as a “must stay” for our next trip to the UK.

At the time I looked, there was, sadly no burnt sugar pudding on the menu.

Crown and Cushion Hotel, Oxfordshire

Janis Joplin

Janis Joplin did not survive the 1970’s.  She died at the age of 27 (one of the founding members of the 27 club) of a drug overdose on October 4th 1970.  Janis Joplin was a big fan of Southern Comfort.  Personally, I tasted it once when I was about 17 and decided SoCo was not for me. I am probably being a bit elitist here but in my head it is a drink drunk by what we call bogans in Australia.  (Chavs would be the equivalent for my UK readers and rednecks? for those in the US).   Any SoCo drinkers out there? I am willing to be proved wrong.  And to be honest this recipe from Jane Rocca for a Janis Joplin Cocktail could be the thing to bring me over.  The rest of the ingredients sound delicious!

Jane Rocca’s recipe for a Janis Joplin cocktail

  • 30ml Southern Comfort
  • 30 ml Lillet Blanc
  • 15 ml Peach Liqueur
  • 3 drops Peach Bitters
  • Twist of lemon to ganish

Shake and strain all ingredients into an old-fashioned glass over ice. 

Garnish with a lemon twist.

Ray Davies

Waterloo Sunset by The Kinks would be in my top ten songs of all time.  At 72, Ray Davies is still around to sing it.  (Yay!)  I could not find a recipe by Ray or The Kinks but the BBC website has a recipe for a cocktail called Waterloo Sunset  – http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/3094680/waterloo-sunsets.

Here is my recipe for Dark House Lentil Soup which is inspired by George Harrison’s recipe in Mary Frampton’s Food With Friends.  I added in a quarter cup of Italian Bean Soup Mix in with my lentils and some carrots.  I also do not like green peppers so I subbed in some celery.  I’m sure George would not have minded.

Dark House Lentil Soup
A delicious and hearty vegan soup, liked by even the staunchest of meat eaters
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Ingredients
  1. 1 red chilli
  2. 1 tsp cumin seeds (I used 1 tsp ground cumin)
  3. 2 large onions, chopped
  4. 2 garlic cloves
  5. 1 cup of lentils, you can use one or a mix of types
  6. 2 large tomatoes, chopped (I used a tin of Italian tomatoes)
  7. 2 Green peppers, chopped (I used two sticks of celery)
  8. 2 carrots chopped
  9. 1 Bay leaf
  10. Salt and Pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Heat a small amount of oil in a frying pan. When oil is good and hot, add the red chili and cumin seeds.
  2. When the seeds stop sputtering, brown the onions and garlic in the seasoned oil. In a separate deep pan, wash the lentils in plenty of water.
  3. When clean, liberally cover with water.
  4. When the onions are browned, add them to the pan of lentils. Then add the tomatoes, peppers, bay leaf, salt, and pepper.
  5. Potatoes and carrots and small boiling onions may be added for a more substantial meal. Bring to the boil, cover, and turn down to very low heat.
  6. The soup is ready to serve in an hour and tastes better the next day.
Adapted from Taryn Fryer
Adapted from Taryn Fryer
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/
 Have a great week!

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Margaret Fulton Cookbook 6 – Missing from the Modern

This is worse than the trout of nightmares.

I’m voting that this has to rank pretty high in the list of three words that should never be put together. 

JELLIED. TURTLE. SOUP.

W.T. F. People of 1977?

You had a lovely Olive and Onion Tart and some fabulous canapés to eat.  Why on earth would you choose to eat soup made from turtles? First that’s just gross and second, they don’t even look like they’d taste good. 

Image (22)Don’t even try to make it better by adding some totally delicious avocado. I’m calling shenanigans on you on this one!

 Even worse.  I was alive then.  My mother better never have fed me turtle soup jellied or otherwise. Or we’ll be having words when I get back.

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 Related articles

 

The Margaret Fulton Cookbook 4 – Soups

 “What wonderful memories I have of soup and my Scottish mother’s kitchen.  We had soup everyday and each one had it’s own character and charm”

 – Margaret Fulton

To me, the character and charm of the soups in the 1977 picture are rather overwhelming.  How much nicer are the modern pictures?  I do however like that there is a nod to the past in the dish for the Soup Chiffonade…

Margaret Fulton Cookbook Soup Collage
Margaret Fulton Cookbook Soup Collage

 And I just love the orange pumpkin soup in the blue bowl. 

In fact, I have used this particular combination more than once on this blog.  Once in one of my posts on Valli Little’s Slow:

Thai Style Tomato Soup
Thai Style Tomato Soup

 And it will shortly feature in my post on Cantina…hmm…maybe it already has?

Pumpkin Soup with Chorizos Migas
Pumpkin Soup with Chorizos Migas

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Drunk Food – The Meat Pie Floater

Meat Pie Floater

I guess each culture has a food they like to eat when drunk.  The Brits for instance love a curry when they are five sheets to the wind.  Closer to home, we in Melbourne like nothing better than a kebab or its Greek cousin, the souvlaki.  Ahhhh….greasy meaty goodness wrapped in pita bread…deeelicious  whatever you call it.  There was also a spate, back in the 1990’s of mobile hot dog vendors but they were a passing fad.  Nothing beats the 3:00am drunken kebab.  Not in this town anyway.

So ubiquitous is the post pub/club kebab run that I assumed it was a national pass-time.  Oh, so wrong.  A few years ago I ventured across the border into South Australian territory for a wedding.  Post-wedding we ventured into the casino and post-casino we ran into one of the weirdest instances of drunk food I have ever seen.  Which of course, in celebration of the month of crazy and Australia Day (January 26th) I am going to replicate here.  We’ll return to that in a moment. 

But first, Adelaide. It’s a weird place.  City of Churches and bizarre serial killings.  And before anyone from South Australia gets their knicks in a knot.  It is true. Dexter said so.  

 And…the very second I typed Adelaide and serial killers, the little app that I have that tells me about related content brought up an article on a body found in a wheelie bin.  You can fool some of the people some of the time South Australia but the internet will not be fooled.  I on the other hand….did I say I lived in Melbourne?  I meant Sydney.  Or Perth.  Yeah, Perth.  It’s even further away and in the opposite direction.  Yep, I definitely live in Perth.  Just in case you are thinking about crossing any boundaries with your serial killer ways, take a leaf from the Village People and Go West.

Meat PieBut I digress, we’re here to talk about food.  Australian food  to boot. The picture above shows one of the classic legendary Australian dishes.  The Meat Pie.  Second possibly only to the Vegemite Sandwich as THE Australian dish. 

We love to eat our meat pies with a bit of….and now here’s some Aussie slang for you….a bit of  “dead horse”.  And no, not in that ooky, literal European way.  “Dead horse” is Australian rhyming slang for tomato sauce.  That would be ketchup to my American friends. 

And in Melbourne Perth this is how we eat our pies. Just as pies.  With ketchup.  Lovehearts optional.

Meat Pie With Sauce
Meat Pie With Sauce

 And, if we have soup…lets just say a rather hearty pea and ham soup.  We have it like this.  Just soup.  Maybe with some crusty bread. Or a crouton.

Pea And Ham Soup
Pea And Chorizo Soup

Let us now return to the street outside the Adelaide casino at 3:00am.

The BF had gone over to the van to get us each a kebab. He came back empty handed and shaking his head.  “It’s not kebabs.  It’s pies and soup.”

“Ewww…who wants soup at this time of night.  But I’ll have a pie. ”

“No, it’s not pies and soup.  It’s pies IN soup”

I honestly did not believe him.  Until I wandered over to take a look.

And sure enough….pies in pea soup…..

This is drunk food in Adelaide.  Seriously.  Loveheart optional.

And if you don’t believe me, here’s some independent confirmation.

Meat Pie Floater
Meat Pie Floater

 I told you they were freaky over there.

I would love to tell you that I tried this and despite all my Victorian West Australian prejudices it was awesome.

Meat Pie Floater jpg
Meat Pie Floater jpg

Except it wasn’t. 

It wasn’t as repulsive as I thought it would be.  But it was definitely a whole that was a lot less than the sum of it’s parts. And nowhere near as good as a kebab.

Maybe you need to be drunk to enjoy it. 

If you want to try this delight for yourself, you can find a recipe for a Beef and Shiraz Pie here.  I have used this recipe before and it is a beauty, however I just bought the ones I used for this.  I made the soup though and it was really good.  I subbed in chorizo for the more traditional ham and it made the soup super tasty! Recipe below.

I am looking forward to a long weekend celebrating Australia Day. Just not with a meat pie floater….

Have a great week where ever you are!!!  I would also love to know what constitutes drunk food in your neck o’ the woods.  Drop me a comment….

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Pea and Chorizo Soup
A delicious hearty take on a pea and ham soup - a classic winter warmer
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Ingredients
  1. 1 tbsp olive oil
  2. 3 chorizo sausages, removed from their casing and diced
  3. 2 carrots, peeled, diced
  4. 2 sticks of celery, peeled, diced
  5. 1 onion chopped finely
  6. 2 cloves of garlic, chopped finely
  7. 300g green split peas
  8. 2litres cold water
  9. Salt and Pepper
To Serve
  1. Warm bread rolls or a meat pie and sauce
Instructions
  1. Rinse the split peas under cold running water until the water runs clear. Drain.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the chorizo and cook until the meat is browned. Add the carrots, celery, onions and garlic and cook, stirring occaisionally, until the onions are softened.
  3. Add the split peas and water. Bring to the boil over high heat.
  4. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer, covered for about an hour or until the split peas are cooked.
  5. Allow to cool slightly then process the mixture to your desired level of “chunkyness” either using a stick blender or by processing small batches of the mix in a blender.
  6. Season with salt & pepper.
  7. Serve with warm bread rolls if you are normal or with a pie and sauce floating in the centre if you are not.
Notes
  1. I like my soup fairly chunky so I usually only put about a third of it in the blender.
Retro Food For Modern Times http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup with Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts

If there’s one food Australians love, it is pumpkin. 

Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup
Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup

Not like this.  This is just creepy….

Found on Modern Mechanix

But unlike our American pals who like to eat their pumpkins for dessert, for us it is sadly almost always served savoury as a vegetable.  Just incidentally though, Australia, why don’t we have pumpkin pie?  We get all the trashy American stuff – the Kardashians and ice bucket challenges to name but a few.  Why can’t we get some of the yummy delicious pumpkin pie action too?

According to this, you don;t even have to cook it.  It’s MAGIC…

Pumpkin Dream Pie

Sadly for us, Pumpkin Dream Pie remains just that…

We eat pumpkin as a side for a roast, in lasagné’s risottos, salads and scones.  But more than eating pumpkin,  we love to drink it.

How much do we love to drink it? Pumpkin soup is a, no probably the Australian ubiquitous menu item –  just about every cafe, restaurant, pub bistro and hole in the wall has their own version prominently displayed on the menu – I go to a cafe where it has been the soup du jour for at least five years. 

Out of curiosity  I had a little look on taste.com.au for pumpkin soup recipes. There are 79 of them.  Ok, so it’s not the 765 recipes they have for chocolate cake but 79 variations on a theme of pumpkin is still quite a number.  There are recipes for Classic Pumpkin Soup, Creamy Pumpkin Soup, Perfect Pumpkin Soup and Smashing Pumpkin Soup (I guess that’s the soup that despite all it’s rage is still just a rat in a cage). 

I did start to notice a trend though -not only do we love our pumpkin soup but we like it to be a bit of a international bright young thing.  There are  recipes for:

Thai, Moroccan, non – specific Asian, Tortellini (Italian), Japanese, Thai again, Thai again again, Curry x 3, South Indian, Australian (whatever that maybe…I didn’t look, possibly flavoured with beer and vegemite), two more Thai’s.  The Americas are represented by one paltry entry for Maine Pumpkin soup.  But you  know what?  If I was given a choice between that soup, (even though it looks and sounds divine) and this:

Inspiration Kitchen’s Dulce De Leche Pumpkin Cheesecake

I wouldn’t be eating Pumpkin soup either.

Africa too is sadly missing from that list.  Ok, yes, Morocco is there but…jeez…(eyeroll), if you must be pedantic, sub-Saharan Africa  is completely missing.  Hopefully not for much longer…because it’s time this delicious Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup adapted from Diana Henry’s Plenty  took the stage!

This is gorgeous to look at, the inclusion of tomato paste and the Berbere spices gives it a real 1970’s burnt orange colour.  It’s really tasty too – slightly sweet from the pumpkin, slightly smoky from the spices, slightly spicy from the chilli and cinnamon and ginger.  If you leave out the yoghurt garnish it is also vegan.  

Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup2
Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup 2

And, whilst I don’t want to blow my own trump….actually, no, wait, it’s my blog, I can blow whatever I damn well want! The Berbere pepitas and pinenuts which were my own invention were amazing!  They add some additional spice and salt and crunch.  The only problem with these is that they are so good you will be hard pressed to save any for the soup.  I had to make about three or four batches of them because we kept eating them before they could be used as the soup garnish.  They are seriously good!  

Berbere Roasted Pepitas and Pinenuts
Berbere Roasted Pepitas and Pinenuts

The key to this soup is the Berbere spice mix.  I bought mine but you can make your own.  There are about a thousand of these on the interwebs, each of which is slightly different. I have included the recipe for Berbere given in Diana Henry’s book below.

Berbere Spice Mix
Berbere Spice Mix

 Either way you’re going to end up with a lot more Berbere than you need to make this one recipe.  Of course you could make the soup more than once and you will surely make the Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts more than once but if you want to experiment a bit more with this spice blend you can also try these:

Doro Wat  – Ethiopian Red Chicken Stew

Berbere Lamb Chops With Lentil Cucumber Salad

Ethiopian Ful Medames

Enjoy and Have a great week!    

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Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup with Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts

Ethiopian Pumpkin Soup with Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts

Ingredients

    For the berbere:
  • 2tsp cumin seeds
  • 8 cloves
  • 1 tsp cardamom seeds
  • 1/2 tsp black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp fenugreek seeds
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 8 small dried red chillies
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/4 tsp groundpinch of turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 tbsp paprika
  • For the soup:
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 5cm fresh root ginger, peeled and grated
  • 750g pumpkin, cut into chunks
  • 3 tbsp tomato puree
  • 1 tsp salt
  • To Serve:
  • Greek yogurt (omit or substitute soy yoghurt if vegan)
  • Fresh coriander
  • For the Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts:
  • 1 tsp Berbere spice mix
  • 1/4 cup Pepita and Pinenut mix (or other nut mix of your choice)
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Instructions

    To make the berbere:
  • Toast the first seven spices in a dry frying pan over medium heat for a couple of minutes until fragrant. Shake the pan often. Cool, then grind in a pestle and mortar with the rest of the spices until you have a fine powder.
  • To make the soup:
  • Heat the oil in a saucepan and cook the onion until soft and pale gold. Add the ginger and 2 tsp of the berbere and continue to cook for a couple of minutes. Add the pumpkin and stir until well covered with the spices, then add the tomato puree, salt and 500ml water.
  • Stir, cover and bring to the boil.
  • Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes until the pumpkin is tender. Cool and use a stick blender or potato masher to puree the mixture until smooth. You may leave some chunks of pumpkin whole - I prefer my soup to be smooth.
  • To make the Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts:
  • Mix the nuts with the spice mix, salt and olive oil. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Pour the mixture onto the tray and spread out. Roast for 10 minutes in a medium until the nuts are golden and fragrant.
  • To Serve:
  • Warm the soup if necessary. Check seasoning and adjust if necessary.
  • Garnish with yoghurt, coriander and the Berbere Pepitas and Pinenuts.
http://www.retrofoodformoderntimes.com/2014/09/06/ethopian-pumpkin-soup-berbere-pepitas-pinenuts/

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